SQL Doc by RedGate

SQL DocI recently was on a call where a technical unit indicated they did not receive any form of documentation around the vendor database that was created. Now, seeing that I fall into the database profession it sparked my fancy. I began to ask a few questions to the individual who was asking for this documentation; these are important questions in that you have to determine if there is a need for what was running through my mind. Sure enough, the technical team, was just needing some guidance on overall structure and what they were dealing with in terms of tables, procedures, and so on. This group was trying to review and write a process around information they were not privy to.

My mind went straight for the SQL Doc utility that RedGate has available. It’s a simple utility really to utilize and often times can save the day for such cases like the one above. Check out the steps below on how easy the utility allows you to document a database on the fly:

Step 1: As you open the application you will be prompted to enter a server location followed by how you’d like to connect to it (Windows or SQL authentication). In this case we’ll just hook up to a local instance I have on hand.

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Step 2: Once connected you’ll have some default settings. There will be a cover page option along with the databases that you want to document.

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Step 3: Looking at the project you’ll begin to review some of the following information:

  • Database Selection
  • Server Properties
  • Server Settings
  • Advanced Server Settings
  • Sections that are included in the report

For this specific test I’m just going to take a look at the TempDB

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The screen capture will note that under Object Types you are able to drill into and get as granular as you can. The below example will show you a snippet from a table in the TempDB and will also show that you can enter a description of what the field is utilized for in the far right hand column under Description.

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Step 4: If you have to save this documentation out for any meetings or other purposes you can create a cover letter along with any logo information and description. Simply click on the cover page option on the left menu and complete the following:

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Step 5: After all the choices are made you can click on the General Documentation Go button on the menu and be prompted for the following:

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Give the location and file a name and BOOM; you’re done.

Summary

You may find yourself in a situation where you are needing a quick hit for documentation purposes. If you are an avid RedGate user and enjoy using their SQL Doc product; or maybe you had this product and didn’t even know what it was then you can benefit greatly from documenting multiple databases in a matter of minutes. This post is to show you what type of utility SQL Doc is and what it can actually be used for in a real life circumstance. In the end it was the right product and right time to use it for a technical team in need. Well done RedGate, well done.

T-SQL Tuesday #89 Invitation – The times they are a-changing

TSQL2SDAY-150x150This month’s topic by Koen Verbeeck (B|T) is based around times that are a changing. To break it down somewhat it was inspired by a blog post that Kendra Little (B|T) put together around Will the Cloud Eat My DBA Job. Koen is wanting to know with the ever-changing world of technology what kind of impact has it had on you and how do you plan to deal with the future of data management/analysis.

To The Cloud

I think one of the topics that I’ve seen a gradual change in is the topic that revolves around the cloud. Being in the financial district cloud talk is not always welcome. It is a myth to some; I am glad that a while back I headed some of Grant Fritchey’s (B|T) advice in that he said you better start learning cloud techniques sooner than later. The cloud discussion is not always a welcomed one, but is one that needs to be had to keep up with innovative technologies.

Finding what is the best solution for you and your respective area the cloud does allow for flexibility and control. One of the main issues I see most shops running into are security based around a cloud model along with costs in data size etc.

With the proper planning and oversight the cloud is a viable option that should not scare away data professionals

Third Party Utilities

I think over time some of the third-party tools have become game changers in a lot of shops. I see vendors such as SQL Sentry and Red Gate that have evolved over time to help streamline and provided better efficiencies around data management and monitoring. Cutting edge keeps the users of these third-party tools on edge and wanting more. Tying all these into automation of daily tasks and not just on premise monitoring but cloud monitoring has been a huge plus for the community.

The Way Business Interprets Data

Data is what drives us; it is what a lot of decisions are derived from and direction of companies and shops. The data is ever-changing and how we look at it. Take for example Power BI. The methods we used years ago have morphed into a greater approach of delivery to businesses. I never thought I would be watching a professional sports game and see them pull out their tablets and review live data in between innings or set of downs.

PowerShell

No, this isn’t a tribute to Mike Fal (B|T) or Drew Furgiuele (B|T), but I do appreciate their nudge in getting me to utilize PowerShell for some of my every day usage. This could fall under the third-party utilities section up above but I thought it beneficial to state that in some cases it has been a game changer. Stumbling upon the DBATools website has been a blessing in disguise; I love getting to work with technology that I may have not utilized as much in the past.

Do You Feel Endangered?

No, and neither should you. I should paraphrase that with don’t be afraid of change for it allows us to learn new technologies and grow on our journey. There will be opportunities to always learn; each day you should strive to learn something new that you didn’t know before. A wise SQL community member once told me, “The data will always be here; will you?”

T-SQL Tuesday

For those that are not aware T-SQL Tuesday is a block party started by Adam Machanic (B|T). Each month community members who blog pick a topic then gather all the blogs who participated in the event and provides a recap. It’s a great method to share knowledge and an avenue to give back to the community. If you are an avid blogger and would like to be a host then do reach out to Adam via the methods provided.

Don’t Duck On Responsibilities

ResponsibilitiesBeing a data professional you assume a certain amount of responsibility. It often requires having the right attitude and an action plan in place for finding the solutions to our problems at hand. Too many times we attack the symptoms causing the issue, but overlook the root cause. The quick Band-Aid fixes are found many times over, whereas our jobs should be identifying the real issues that lie beneath the symptoms. Now, don’t get me wrong – I understand at times you have to stop the bleeding. In the end though one should uncover the root cause and make the permanent fix.

Prioritize the issue at hand

Chances are you, dear reader, encounter many problems throughout the day. Never try to solve all the problems at one time; instead make them line up for you one by one. Might seem odd but make them stand in a single file line and tackle them one at a time until you’ve knocked them all out. You may not like what you find when uncovering the root cause issues, but that is part of the process. Be careful of this uncovering and be cognizant that what you find with the issues may or may not be the root to all the problems.

Take time and define the problem

In it’s simplest form, take time out and ask yourself this question – “What is the problem?” Sounds easy enough doesn’t it; you’d be amazed by the many accounts of knee jerk reactions data professionals make all over the world. You  may be thinking to yourself that there has to be more to it than that. Think about it in four easy steps:

  • Ask the right questions – if you only have a vague idea of the situation, then don’t ask general questions. Do not speculate but instead ask process related questions things relating to trends or timing. What transpired over the course of the week that may have led to this issue.
  • Talk to the right people – you will face people who inevitably will have the all-knowing and all correct way that things should be done. Heed caution to such as you may find resistant to change and blind spots by these individuals. Creativity is, at times, essential to any problem-solving skill.
  • Get the “set in stone” facts – once the facts are all laid out and defined you may find that the decision is pretty concise and clear on action that should be taken.
  • Be involved – don’t just let the first three steps define you; get involved in the process of being the solution.

Questions to ask yourself regarding the problem

  • Is this a real problem?
  • Is it urgent?
  • Is the true nature of the problem known?
  • Is it specific?
  • Are all parties who are competent to discuss the issue involved?

Build a repository

Once you’ve come to the conclusion and provided a solution to the issue – document it. I know I just lost several readers there. Believe it or not documentation will save your bacon at some point. Maybe not next week or next month, but at some point down the line it will. Some things to consider are:

  • Were we able to identify the real cause to the problem?
  • Did we make the right decision?
  • Has the problem been resolved by the fix?
  • Have any key people accepted the solution?

I am reminded by a saying I once ran across:

Policies are many, Principles are few, Polices will change, Principles never do

Summary

Each day we encounter issues and problems. Don’t let them define you but rather you define the issue. Often times we overlook the root cause; remember to go through your process, policy, and standards in rectifying the problems at hand. It is better to tackle the problems when they are known than to sweep them under the rug for the next data professional to come along and then they are faced with fixing them.

Hopefully this short post will provoke you to think about the issues you deal with on a daily basis and how best to tackle them.

Are You Wasting Energy?

Teamsuccess.jpgOften times we as leaders within our respective shops tend to waste our time focusing on the wrong things. Think about that for a moment and think about the team that you are on or that you are leading. I’ve seen it happen among some very talented teams where we (yes I include myself in this) are not tapping into the expertise of our teams bringing for the most potential out of each team member.

Over the course of time I’ve come across some things that have helped me in a leadership role that may help some other data professionals out there who are starting out or maybe even a season vet.

Want Results?

  • Eliminate those distractions – you have to define out what matters most. What are you or the team doing that may prevent you from focusing on the real tasks at hand.
  • Get Real – face it; there will be times when those awkward conversations are needed. Hold each other accountable if you are on a team, and if you are a lone DBA which some of my friends out there are then build a base in the community of trusted advisors. Bounce some ideas off them.
  • Point out what is not working – this may seem simple enough, but believe me it’s not always that easy to overcome it. Constantly review processes and procedures to make sure you are thriving forward; not drifting backward.
  • Set some goals – do this with your team, individuals, or yourself – put the emphasis on with.

Change is hard; change is never easy. That’s where coaching comes in; you have to stick with it. Trust me; if it were easy then everyone would be doing it.

What Are Some Ways To Define Success?

  • Respect and leverage – I’ve personally found that when teams respect each other and can strategically leverage each persons talents then watch out. You are about to witness something special take place.
  • Management has focus – as I typed this I had to take a moment and reflect on the team I’m blessed to lead. I’m I positively focused on leading the group – I do believe I have their best interest but that doesn’t mean “we” won’t make mistakes. I include we, cause dear reader, you may be in this category with me.
  • Does your team matter – your colleagues and teammates; the ones you get in the trenches with on a daily basis should feel like they matter.
  • Ability to be innovative – one of the key success points I’ve experienced is turning a team loose and just say, “be innovative”. End of day I got your back, and guess what you will fail. Let me repeat myself; you will fail. However, if you are not being innovative or your team or colleagues are scared to try anything new from fear of backlash then are you truly pushing forward?
  • Good enough isn’t really good enough – a saying that has stuck with me my whole life is a simple one. Somewhere someone is practicing getting better, and when you meet that person one on one will you rise to the challenge. It is okay to set the bar high and it is also okay to keep working hard toward and end goal. On the flip side to that it is also okay to learn from your mistakes and let that be the fuel to the fire to keep getting after it.

Summary

I challenge you to embrace your aspirations today. If you lead a team of data professionals then take a long hard look at how you are leading your group. Let innovation; collaboration, and engagement with others turn into respect, leveraging talent, and building on success. If we are bragging or dwelling on the past; then that may mean we are not doing enough in the present.

How’s that fuel in the fire; are you passionate about succeeding? These are just some thoughts in my own mind that I’ve jotted down over the years that may help you along your journey as a data professional. Time to get after it and make it happen ~ BE THE CHANGE.

Is There A Threat Inside?

Data-PrivacyIf you’ve been involved in technology for any length of time you are aware of outside threats to your network or databases. You read about some of these threats in the news such as hacking, breaches, etc.

All of these outside threats are pertinent and require our attention to detail as data professionals, but along with that threat are you considering any threats that could occur on the inside? Every shop should have some form of guidelines, documentation, regulations around their processes.

The risk from inside threats such as employees, ex-employees, and trusted partners. Some of these threats are accidental while others can be of a malicious nature. In either circumstance the consequences can be devastating for a company. Below are some things to think about within your own environment to prevent such actions from occurring.

Secure User Access

  • Stop unauthorized access – in all honesty this means button up the shop. If you have SA access across the board you are doing it wrong. Think about utilization of role based security, AD groups, etc. You are responsible for the data so don’t make this an afterthought.
  • Manage the threat of shared passwords – fifteen people shouldn’t have access to critical accounts. Check into secure user and password utility such as Secret Server; there are a number of companies out there that provide such products. Who is accessing these accounts and why?
  • Organizational Critical Assets – a companies assets such as data is one of the most important and integral pieces to the puzzle – it needs to be treated as such. This can mean many different things on many different levels. Do you know who is accessing your data and why?
  • Immediate Response to Suspicious Behavior – What do you do when you find activity going on that raises some concern? If you don’t have a process in place of reporting this then I suggest you think about getting one in place. Standards of such events are important; trust me on this. The time will come (and it will come) when threats become real. Procedures should be in place and gone over with all related data teams.

I ran across this article some time back from simple-talk and found it to be very fruitful in showing you How to Get SQL Server Security Horribly Wrong When you get time do check it out. In many cases I have run across security is an after thought – don’t let it be.

Define Areas of Vulnerability

This is a key component in getting started with taking your data seriously. Accessibility to information is a key deliverable in most shops; the data is the heartbeat. Face it; we live in a world today that is data driven; many decisions throughout every minute of the day are based on integrity of the data. Without addressing security in the design around the data it will leave you open to potential threats.

  • Network File Shares
  • Legacy Permissions
  • Logging and Monitoring
  • Change Control

These are just to name a few that could be potential vulnerabilities a shop can be exposed to.

Summary

We, as data professionals, need to take control and secure our data. But even more importantly we need to educate our end users on best practices and standards within the companies and shops we are associated with. Security can no longer be an afterthought.

If this means changing some things and rattling some cages then so be it; it may just save you in the end from a major security breach. We often are aware of external threats; what most people tend to over look are the threats from within the walls of a company.

It is imperative to take preventative measures and even the highest level of clearance should be monitored in some form or fashion. Think about the DBA for a second, and not just because I am one. They have the keys to the kingdom so to speak; same as a lot of sysadmins. There should be transparency in their actions; auditing should occur as to the what, when, and why.

Taking it a step further would be conducting data forensics (that would be a fun topic of discussion)

Bottom line I encourage you to start taking security around your data seriously if not someone else will.

How I Became A…SQL Server Data Professional

OopsLast night I saw a tweet from Matt Gordon (b|t); the topic caught my eye – “How I Became A…SQL Server Data Professional”. The original idea spawned from Kevin who is known as the SQL Cyclist (b|t) over here at this post

I’ll have to fill in the blank the same as Matt Gordon has with “How I Became A SQL Server Data Professional”

It definitely was not a bed of roses to get to where I am at now. My story is the same as many others across the world in that I became a DBA pretty much on accident at the time. I was a developer right out of college writing code in a language called Progress (think Visual Basic). I still remember to this today seeing variables in the code that had been passed down for a while with the Gilligan Island characters; you know skipper = minnow + Gilligan.

Needless to say I spent three years at that job and enjoyed it, but with growth and thinking I could take on the world I wanted to spread my wings and fly a little bit; which landed me the next 8 years at a place where my groundwork for getting into SQL would really flourish. I was doing SQL development work sprinkled in with some .Net and quickly realized that I wanted to stick with the core engine. Not sure why but SQL just stuck; it was intriguing to me. How to make queries run faster, how to get the most out of the engine,  why were queries taking such a long time to execute. All these things kept running through my head. Doing database work was building me into becoming the DBA that would bring me to my next job.

It was at this job where I got my feet wet with what SQL Community, PASS Summit, and Mentorship was all about. It’s been 5 solid years since getting involved and it has been one heck of a ride. As I sit back and look at where I started to where I am today I would never have guessed it. If you were to go back when I was younger people in my past would tell you that if it wasn’t sports oriented I would not have anything to do with it. Becoming a SQL Data Professional is not just a job to me; it’s a passion.

As I sit here and reflect back to all those memories I’m thankful for each one of them. No, it hasn’t always been easy. I believe the harder times have molded me and made me into a stronger more durable Data Professional. Whatever road you take to become what you are remember one thing – it is your journey; your story. You are the CEO of your destiny. Rise and grind – get it done.

Summary

I encourage you to take Kevin’s initial request to heart and think about when you became what you are now. How did you get there? What roads did you travel? Hope you had a good time reading this post; as it sparked a lot of memories for me. I wouldn’t trade any of them for anything in the world.

What Is SQL Saturday?

SQL SaturdayI was recently approached and asked, “What is SQL Saturday? I actually get asked that question more times than not from other people within and outside the community that have never had the pleasure of attending an event. I’d like to take a moment, and from my own perspective lay out the what, why, and how come you should familiarize yourself with such great events across the globe.

The What

You can read the official “What is SQL Saturday About” here

The Yates version is what you will find in this blog post and what it means to me as a data professional. Oddly enough I attended my first SQL Saturday event 4 yrs ago, and that stemmed from going to my first PASS Summit 6 yrs ago. Why the gap you ask? I don’t have a good reason; but what I can say is I was enamored by the fact I could go to this free event and learn from top-tier speakers. Usually there is a fee involved for lunch which is minimal and in some cases I’ve seen where you bring your own. These events usually consist of DBA, BI, Professional Development tracks split up across a full days time. In it you’ll find some speakers you would see at PASS Summit all the way to local and regional speakers. The good thing about these events are you can network and share experiences and knowledge with other data professionals from all walks of professions on top of the learning.

Depending on the size of the event you will have a chance to talk to various sponsors regarding their products that they offer. Not all events will have sponsors and that’s okay. The purpose of these events are to “help” people continue to learn and for others to pay forward the opportunities they have experienced.

The Why

The why is important. If you don’t get or read anything else on this post I want you to stop, open your eyes, take this in. I can sum it up in one word for you – PEOPLE.

I’ve found myself being a co-organizer for our local event in Louisville, KY – you can read about our upcoming one here. This is no easy undertaking, and I’ve seen the value; the difference it makes in data professionals. In speaking of giving back to what has been afforded to you; this is one way I believe that I can make an impact on the community. There is nothing like seeing a light bulb go off or seeing someone who has attended these events come up to you and say that something finally clicks. It’s about the attendees; the people.

Listen, it’s not a life about glitz and glamour. It’s hard work, it’s dedication, it’s requiring you to have a drive that when you are faced with adversity you overcome it. These events provide avenues for data professionals who can’t travel to the big conferences. Providing good quality learning is key to developing and cultivating our growing SQL Community ~ I’m a huge proponent that each one reach one. Stop and think about that for a second. Imagine how many people we have in our SQL Community. If each person reached one other person, my oh my, and if we help one at these said events then it is worth it in my eyes.

How Come

In my finite mind it started with a vision Andy Warren, Brian Knight, and Steve Jones had back in 2007. Knowing 2 of the 3 people listed I know that the mindset was geared toward  helping others learn because I know how much they have invested in me over the years. I look at SQL Saturday’s differently than I used to; over time it has grown from learning, soaking up all the knowledge I could; to speaking, volunteering, and helping at said events.

Believe it or not; speakers are people to. It is always encouraging when you see new speakers submit abstracts to these events. It allows for development and growth of upcoming rising stars to let their talents shine through.

Conclusion

If you haven’t attended a SQL Saturday then why not start? You can get a full listing of events here

I do request one thing of you if you attend. You will see volunteers at these events; remember one thing. They do this for free; we aren’t paid huge salary major league contracts; instead they (we) put in blood sweat and tears to put on a good event for you to come learn. I encourage you to seek one of them out and just say thank you; you will have no idea how much it will mean to them.

If you need help getting plugged into a SQL Saturday near you let me know. I’d love to talk to you and help you get started on your journey to further learning – just leave me a comment and I’ll reach out to you.

If you are a new and upcoming speaker, again give me a shout. I’ll be happy to provide some insights and tricks that has helped me over the years.

Let’s get after it and make it happen – each one reach one. Let’s Roll

Backup/Restore–What’s My Status?

WaitingThe day begins and you find yourself going through a list in your mind of things that need to be accomplished. You either make a mental note, jot it down on paper, or input notes into your mobile device. The day is getting off to a great start; you feel as though you have a sense of direction and purpose before you even open up shop for the day. It is then the phone rings or you get alerted to trouble; issues on the horizon.

The issue at hand requires a backup or restore to be completed and you find yourself dependent on the mercy of SQL processing the request. We’ve all been there; phone rings again and it is someone on the other line asking you:

  1. Are we done yet?
  2. What’s the status?
  3. How much longer will this take?

These are all legitimate questions that you will be asked, and it’s okay. Pressure situations are opportunities to make it happen. Over the years data professionals have built out their own script and document libraries. I’ve carried scripts around for years, one script I like to utilize regarding backups and restores is below. I have some variations to this script with what it pulls back, but the standard script hits the sys.dm_exec_requests  DMV.

SELECT  r.session_id ,
r.command ,
CONVERT(NUMERIC(6, 2), r.percent_complete) AS [Percent Complete] ,
CONVERT(VARCHAR(20), DATEADD(ms, r.estimated_completion_time,
GETDATE()), 20) AS [ETA Completion Time] ,
CONVERT(NUMERIC(10, 2), r.total_elapsed_time / 1000.0 / 60.0) AS [Elapsed Min] ,
CONVERT(NUMERIC(10, 2), r.estimated_completion_time / 1000.0 / 60.0) AS [ETA Min] ,
CONVERT(NUMERIC(10, 2), r.estimated_completion_time / 1000.0 / 60.0
/ 60.0) AS [ETA Hours] ,
CONVERT(VARCHAR(1000), ( SELECT SUBSTRING(text,
r.statement_start_offset / 2,
CASE WHEN r.statement_end_offset = -1
THEN 1000
ELSE ( r.statement_end_offset
– r.statement_start_offset )
/ 2
END)
FROM   sys.dm_exec_sql_text(sql_handle)
))
FROM    sys.dm_exec_requests r
WHERE   command IN ( ‘RESTORE DATABASE’, ‘BACKUP DATABASE’ );

By checking only for the restore and backup command lines you will be able to quickly identify your session id and get an  approximate ETA and percentage complete. you can tinker of course with the estimations if you’d like or pull back more fields. This is just a simple technique in utilizing a helpful DMV to provide info quickly.


Additional information

Aaron Bertrand (b|t) wrote a post several years ago around sys.dm_exec_requests that has good information in it that you can find here.

You can find the MSDN listing for sys.dm_exec_requests here.

What are DMV’s?

DMV’s are Dynamic Management Views within SQL that can help with a myriad of troubleshooting, performance tuning, and overall health of a system. You can find all the categories for DMV’s and learn more about them here.

Wrapping Up

I’ve been on both sides of the fence in the past where third-party tools are not always possible to have. These DMV’s can be life savers in certain situations; you can parachute in and parachute out gathering knowledge on any given situation. I urge you to explore and learn new things that may help you in your future.

**DISCLAIMER – Do not take code blindly from the internet because you found it on a blog and execute it without first testing it yourself.**

Why Use Red Gate’s SQL Multi Script?

Someone once told me at the shop that we have plenty of software utilities laying around that could be very useful that no one is utilizing. I got to thinking about that from a DBA standpoint; we are fortunate enough to have the Tool Belt from Red Gate and with that comes a plethora of utilities such as SQL Data Generator, SQL Document Manager, SQL Compare, SQL Data Compare, and the list could go on (full listing).

One of those said utilities is a little gem called SQL Multi Script. For me I have found this utility most useful. First of all I’m a heavy SQL Compare (why use SQL Compare) user. We utilize it here in the shop daily for the most part and I like the ease of how to call all of Red Gate’s apps from one location:

By clicking on the icon in top left you will be presented with a list of utilities in your tool belt (pending on your licenses and I’m using version 12.1)

RedGateIcon

As you can see the SQL Multi Script utility is the last on my drop down menu:

RedGateIcon2

The Why?

So, now that we’ve established how easy it is to call the utilities from any said location within the product line; exactly what does multi script mean for me? Glad you asked; I’m going to try to take you on a journey inside a utility while painting an example of how to use to tool in a real life example.

When you first come into the utility you will see a screen similar to the one below:

RedGateIcon3

What I like about the utility is the ease and flow of the product. It didn’t take long to get up and running with it. If you notice on the left hand side you have the option of adding existing or new scripts to the template. In my case for releases this allows us to save multiple schema changes for various databases and incorporate them into one setting for a quick review and execution. One thing that I have ran across, that is no fault to the utility, is static data scripts that may need to be run in a certain order, but that is up to me to put in the correct order of execution once I get the scripts into multi script. I will show an example below of what multiple scripts look like within the utility.

On the right hand side you will see  a distribution list. By clicking on configure you can set up a list of servers that you normally deploy or execute to in one location. One thing to keep in mind is to execute the scripts according to which server (databases) you select. Be cognizant of which ones you are selecting within the utility.

Example of adding existing scripts:

RedGateIcon4

Example of configuration set up:

RedGateIcon5

At the far right you can see I have a test distribution list set up. This affords me the ability to add servers from the list on the left or I can add any SQL server into my listing. From there I can pull down exact databases on that server to execute scripts against. For this purpose I’ll pick a couple of databases from the local server for review:

RedGateIcon6

I have two scripts I want to execute against two databases on my local. I can execute both scripts if I want at the same time or I can execute one script at a time. I also have the ability to select only one database I want to run the scripts against or I can select both databases to run the script against (think of syntax and proper use of database names if you go this route in the script). This is just flexible functionality in which the utility presents.

Back to my case at hand; since we deploy to multiple servers against multiple databases also think about the big picture. I can include databases from all over the enterprise environment if needed and let the Multi Script utility control when to run what, where, and in what order. If you look closely you will notice a blue arrow pointing down in the “Scripts to Execute” section. This arrow, along with the up error next to it, allows me to move my scripts up and down in the order I want to. So I can add all the scripts I want at one time and then come back through and organize them when I am ready.

The Results

Now, after the script execution is complete you can review the results in the lower window pane of the Multi Script utility. Will look similar to results window below:

MultiScriptResults

A feature I like is the ability to save multiple script executions in different formats on work that was completed; this comes in handy when supplying back a summary report of what was changed to a:

  • Change Management Team
  • QA Team
  • Dev Team

MultiScriptSaveResults

Said All That To Say This

There are various utilities available to us that we may not even have explored yet. This little utility by Red Gate has come in real handy for myself and my team. Take the time to look at what is available to you and see what may fit your needs. This concept does not just pertain to Red Gate utilities. Look at various things in your everyday routine and ask yourself:

  1. What can I utilize to become more efficient?
  2. Why am I not utilizing the utility?
  3. Is there a lack of knowledge?
  4. Where are my gaps that I can improve on and how do I get there?
  5. Is there a utility out there where I won’t have to reinvent the wheel?

Look for the hidden gems and continue to provide “Leadership Through Service”

Hold The Fort

stressHave you ever heard the phrase “Hold The Fort”? Long ago in battle supply routes were targeted by enemy regiments that would cut off rations to fighting units. As the battle ensued the enemy had driven back their counterparts to a small area on a hill. They were being overwhelmed with many wounded and dying; that is until in the distance they noticed reinforcements were on the way.

How many times have you, as a data professional, been stuck wondering the same thing? Battered, worn down, and flat-out exhausted until you look and see reinforcements on the horizon. Sure, we’ve all been there, but to some it is a question of how do I call in re-enforcement’s or how do I even go about sending out a help signal? Below are some various ways you can tackle problems:

Forums

There are several forums out there that can provide some great insights into similar issues that you may be experiencing. To a certain extent I think forums are a great avenue to explore potential solutions. With that said however you cannot take every answer verbatim. There can be some off the wall answers out there that shouldn’t be followed. It is important to test anything you find on the web regardless of who it comes from.

You can find some of the forums I frequently attend here.

#sqlhelp

One thing that I’ve learned about the community is the willingness to help each other out. Remember above when I stated “Hold the fort, and reinforcements are on the way”; this is a good twitter hashtag to be familiar with. Professionals from all over the world take this seriously and it is not to be mistreated on how it is utilized. I have received great assistance in the past on issues I’ve been stuck with.

Phone a friend

We all have our “go to group” we bounce ideas off of. Sometimes it is helpful to bounce ideas off of another data professional. You may surprise yourself and actually start talking through your problem and come to an answer you may not have arrived to had you not initiated the conversation.

Old Fashion Testing

As a data professional you cannot be afraid to get your hands dirty. Prove your theories and test the scenarios as you run across them. One should be doing this anyway, but in doing so a wealth of knowledge gained is at your fingertips. We stop learning when we stop trying; just because you encounter one failure doesn’t mean you stop. You keep fighting and beating down that door until you make it through the other side. How bad do you want it?

Is It A Vendor Product?

I have the opportunity to work with a plethora of vendors. Maybe your issue revolves around a vendor product and you are not able to make any changes. Great, this happens all the time to data professionals. Some questions I’ll throw out there are:

  1. Have you opened a dialogue with the vendor about the issue?
  2. Have you documented the issue; not just call and say I have a problem?
  3. Have you tried to reproduce the error?
  4. It it already a known bug?
  5. Is it something that we can address internally before we talk with the vendor?

I’ve worked with a couple great vendors in Red Gate and SentryOne over the years. As a data professional I’ve seen vendors (not all) take pride in a quick response time. If there is an issue with a product they will want to take care of it in a swift manner or provide feedback as to why, when, and what to expect.

Internal Resources

I’m going to say this here, and it may shock some of you. No one knows everything; there may be some who elude or perpetuate appearances that they know everything there is to know,  but that is not the case. Whether you are in a shop or maybe a consultant (who can tap into their contact base) there are internal methods to maybe approach a different business unit or tech unit on an issue to get an outside perspective. Sometimes a fresh set of eyes goes a long way.

Technical Blogs

There are many great technical blogs out there; I have listed some in my DBA Blogs section to the right of this page. Each person is different and has their own go to Blog for review. I receive questions all the time from readers and other data professionals; being respectful is key but I have not seen one data professional out there who would not extend a helping hand if presented in a respectful manner. DO NOT TAKE this as one will provide an answer. We may show you how to connect the dots, but it is important one takes the necessary steps to get to the answer on their own. Nothing is given….work hard for it.

User Groups

Maybe your issue is not a hot ticket item and it can wait to a user group meeting. These are great places to bring up questions and issues in a local environment with some pretty stellar professionals. I guarantee that if you ask a question and no one knows the answer then someone will do their best to find out that answer and further the discussion. An example of a user group can be found here.

PASS Summit

Perhaps your issue is ongoing and you are at the PASS Summit. Great, besides being at a conference with over 6k of our closest friends I would take advantage of the SQLCat and AzureCat Team’s hours. It is a great way to tell Microsoft of your issues and get advice from some of the top-tier people in our industry.

Conclusion

I don’t know what your situation is or will be. Obstacles will come from all angles this year; it is up to us on how we deal with them. I would be amiss if I sat here and didn’t tell you that it won’t always be easy. Nothing in life is easy; some days you will have to work and grind your way through until you get to an answer for an issue. In the end though, when you do find that answer (and you will) you will be able to learn from it and move on. It is part of a data professionals journey.

Keep fighting and keep working toward your end goals. Never stop learning; never stop gaining knowledge.